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Buchtipps - African Publishers

A house brings two unique people together by the unlikeliest of chances. In their union, that of an almost priest and a prodigal daughter, two brothers whose bond transcend the laws of nature are born. André and Max have a seemingly blissful life until the boys start sharing dreams and their lives begin to unravel. Murderous thoughts, manic dreams, and their somewhat unbreakable wandering between reality and reverie, would lead them down unknown paths that threaten to severe their family ties.

When Anthony Mukoro discovers he cannot father a child, his whole world comes crashing. In a desperate bid to sire an heir, he plunges into the reckless life of a pleasure-seeking libertine. But everything changes when he meets and falls head over heels in love with Odufa, a beautiful young girl with a past. Their coming together is fraught with obstacles and challenges that pits them against everything; from tradition to stereotyped beliefs. But nothing is as it seems as they both get entangled in a love affair so intense and toxic, it quickly begins to spiral out of control.

Zango is a surreal town where men, some with erect manhoods, die when leaves fall from a life tree.  Zango is both setting and spectre for ‘Dreams and Assorted Nightmares’, a collection of interconnecting short stories which explore the spaces between life and death and beyond. 

In this book, Mahala is in the company of prominent South African authors including Can Themba, James Matthews, Njabulo S. Ndebele and Zukiswa Wanner. Known for his excellent re-imagination of Themba’s The Suit, which is also featured in this collection, Mahala recasts fresh perspectives on Matthews’s classic story, The Park, and embarks on an intergenerational dialogue with other prominent South African writers. Red Apple Dreams is a compilation of Mahala’s best stories, some new and others previously published in different anthologies.

Edited by Niq Mhlongo and published in by Jonathan Ball Publishers Black Tax: Burden or Ubuntu? is a book that addresses the everyday life of Black South Africans. It aims to provide a better understanding of the social, economic, and political organisation of those affected by ‘black tax’ and who are no longer willing to be trapped within its confines. As the Contributors of the book agree, the ‘black tax’ is a reality for nearly every Black South African, ranging from young adults who are building a home for their parents to people offering their homes to distant family members.

NATASHA Omokhodion-Kalulu Banda’s debut novel No Be From Hia is a fascinating, wide-ranging tale that traces the lives of two cousins, both of mixed family heritage, from childhood through adolescence to adulthood: one from a man and the other from the distant side of the family. Maggie Oluwaseun Ayomide and her Zambian mother Stella Kombe live in Lusaka, Zambia, while Bupe Kombe resides in London, United Kingdom together with her parents, Jasmine and Charles Kombe, fondly known in family circles as CJ.

In Port Harcourt at the height of the kidnap of oil workers in the Niger Delta, a kidnapping goes awry, and four lives are reconnected. Douye aka Doughboy the career militant responsible for the crime, Amaibi the gentle university professor / eco-warrior accused. Kaniye the lawyer turned restaurateur who tries to get him off and Tubo an amoral oil company executive.

A Broken People’s Playlist is a collection of short stories with underlying themes so beautifully woven that each story flows into the other seamlessly. From its poignant beginning in “Lost Stars” a story about love and it’s fleeting, transient nature to the gritty, raw musical prose encapsulated in “In The City”, a tale of survival set in the alleyways of the waterside. A Broken People’s Playlist is a mosaic of stories about living, loving and hurting through very familiar sounds, in very familiar ways and finding healing in the most unlikely places.

The impresario Farini introduced Em-Pee and his troupe to his kind of show business, and now they must earn their bread. In 1885 in a bustling New York City, they are the performers who know the true Zulu dances, while all around them fraudsters perform silly jigs. Reports on the Anglo-Zulu War portrayed King Cetshwayo as infamous, and audiences in London and New York flock to see his kin.

Who are these Guptas who are so powerful, they're distributing cabinet posts like matrons handing out condoms at a brothel? Who do Americans think they are, accusing Trevor Noah of stealing a joke from one of their comedians? Is Sizakele MaKhumalo Zuma's spaza shop a National Key Point? In #ZuptasMustFall, and other rants, Fred Khumalo runs riot, contemplating the pressing issues that continue to confound, infuriate and exasperate the nation ? or to sink it into further controversy.